Visibility into cloud needed for security

By:
Jason McGee-Abe
Published on:

Enterprises need to know not just who has control to the data, and also who potentially could have access to it

WAN SummitThe perennial concern about security - how to ensure security in SD-WAN technology as well as how security can be ensured in the deployment of SD-WAN - was a constant theme throughout the two-day WAN Summit held in New York City.

Efforts to strengthen security has to begin from the data centre, said Javier Pereira, senior director of market development at C&W Networks, during a panel discussion. “Secure the data centre, the network, and then the customer. Learn more about how the traffic moves and you will detect issues faster,” he said.

Boundaries should also be established when connecting to the public cloud to decrease vulnerabilities and exposure to threats, added Lionel Marie, lead network architect of Schneider Electric’s global internet and cloud connectivity. At the most fundamental level, “ensure there is a firewall between the cloud and legacy networks,” he said. 

When it comes to evaluating the public cloud, enterprises need to know what their content is, the data costs involved in migrating to the cloud, and more importantly, who is governing that content. “You need to know who has control and access to the data and who has the potential to have access to the data,” said Mark DeLorenzo, senior director of global technology services at Sensata Data.

A decentralised security approach will enable enterprises to have the visibility they need, said Andy Weiss, VP sales of Open Systems of Switzerland. “When you have multiple clouds and a global spread of applications, you really need enforcement points as well as availability and visibility from end to end.”

The discussion panels agreed that ultimately a holistic security approach is required in executing a successful deployment to SD-WAN as security cannot be treated separately from networking - both should be considered alongside each other. GTB

Reporting by Agnes Stubbs